An employee at Chrysler Group’s social media agency, New Media Strategies, was fired after he used the F-word in a tweet on Chrysler’s official Twitter account. The tweet said –

 “I find it ironic that Detroit is known as the #motorcity and yet no one here knows how to fucking drive.”


The tweet was deleted but seems to have been preserved as it was forwarded by other twitter users. As a result of the tweet, the employee was fired the Chrysler announced that it won’t renew the contract with the social media agency.

When a reporter called yesterday snarkily asking, “seen any good tweets lately,” I knew exactly what was coming next — a firestorm across the web regarding an errant tweet by a now-former employee of Chrysler’s social media agency.

 The tweet denigrated drivers in Detroit and used the fully spelled-out F-word. It was obviously meant to be posted on the person’s personal twitter account, and not the Chrysler Brand account where it appeared.

 First, Chrysler did not fire this person since this wasn’t one of our employees. The agency did. It was their decision. We didn’t demand it.

 Second, as the day and night wore on, comments on various social media sites increasingly expressed either dismay that someone would lose their job over an online oops and that Chrysler was acting, as one poster put it, “in a stiff, corporate way.” Some posters even asked why we didn’t make light of an accidental “f-bomb.”

 
So why were we so sensitive? That commercial featuring the Chrysler 200, Eminem and the City of Detroit wasn’t just an act of salesmanship. This company is committed to promoting Detroit and its hard-working people. The reaction to that commercial, the catchphrase “imported from Detroit,” and the overall positive messages it sent has been volcanic.Source: blog.chryslerllc.com

 

Chrysler is promoting a new campaign for the motorcity with the new punch line – “Imported from Detroit.”

Embarrassing tweet for the Detroit giant.

 

 

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